Business intelligence for knowledge generation at tourism destinations – A case from Sweden

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Matthias Fuchs | May 4, 2018 | 10 am | E.2.42

Abstract

A knowledge infrastructure which has recently been implemented at the leading Swedish mountain tourism destination, Åre is presented. By applying a Business Intelligence approach, the Destination Management Information System Åre (DMIS-Åre) drives knowledge creation and application as a precondition for organizational learning at tourism destinations. After having introduced the development process of indicators measuring destination performance as well as customer behavior and experience, the presentation highlights core aspects of destination data warehousing and how DMIS-Åre can be used by tourism managers to gain new knowledge about customer-based destination processes, like “Web-Navigation”, “Booking” and “Feedback”, respectively.

Bio

matfuc - Kopie__Matthias Fuchs, Ph.D. is Full Professor of Tourism Management & Economics at the Department of Tourism Studies and Geography, Mid-Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden. His research includes electronic-tourism (mobile services, e-business readiness and impact, online auctions, business intelligence and big-data), destination branding, and tourism economic impact analysis. Matthias is associate-editor of the Journal of Information Technology & Tourism. He serves on the editorial-board of the Journal of Travel Research, Annals of Tourism Research, Tourism Analysis, and the Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Management. Matthias is board member of IFITT (International Federation for Information Technology and Travel & Tourism) and chaired the research track at ENTER Conference in 2012. In 2018, Matthias was the overall chair of the ENTER@Jönköping, Sweden. Website:
https://www.miun.se/en/personnel/MatthiasFuchs/

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The process of new venture creation – towards the booming ICT start-ups

Prof. Tõnis Mets | April 24, 2018 | 10 am | K.0.01

Abstract

Estonia has enjoyed success stories in ICT implementation in a broad field of public and private sectors for last 15-20 years. The key event for that development was the launching of the Tiger Leap program in Estonian schools, 1996. The program fully equipped schools with computers and Internet access and other ICT services. Computer science classes were provided in 84% of schools in the following eight years. Since 2014 World Economic Forum considered Estonia among innovation-driven knowledge-based societies, and some years later – being hidden entrepreneurship champion in Europe. Besides, Estonia has become one of the developed start-up ecosystems where young ICT companies are booming.

These events mentioned above refer to the successful combination of educational and entrepreneurial ecosystems in Estonia. The presentation aims to disclose the role of ICT start-ups as the engine of the innovation-driven development in a small society. Case studies analyse the entrepreneurial process and journey of ICT start-ups suggesting dynamic stage model approach. This approach discloses complexity of the entrepreneurial journey from opportunity recognition to venture launch. Findings of studies show growing importance of digital technology, ICT start-ups and the entrepreneurial ecosystem in the welfare of Estonian citizens.

Bio

MetsTõnis Mets is Professor of Entrepreneurship at the University of Tartu in Estonia. He was Marie Curie Research Fellow at the Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research at the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia 2014-2016. Also, Professor Mets is a founder of five companies, sold three of them. He has worked as a management consultant in his company (ALO OÜ), and as an entrepreneur, engineer, and manager in various high-tech companies in Estonia. Tõnis graduated from the Tallinn University of Technology. He also holds a Ph.D. in Technical Sciences from St Petersburg Agrarian University. Professor Mets is author and co-author of 15 patents, and more than 50 chapters and articles with international publishers. His main research interests are in the fields of (technology) entrepreneurship, intellectual property, and knowledge and innovation management.

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Video Compression beyond HEVC: Coding Tools for SDR and 360-degree Video

Dr.-Ing. Mathias Wien, RWTH Aachen University | May 14, 2018 | 16:00 | E.2.42

Abstract: In October 2017, ISO/IEC JCT1 SC29/WG11 MPEG and ITU-T SG16/Q6 VCEG have jointly published a Call for Proposals on Video Compression with Capability beyond HEVC and its current extensions. It is targeting at a new generation of video compression technology that has substantially higher compression capability than the existing HEVC standard. The responses to the call are evaluated in April 2018, forming the kick-off for a new standardization activity in the Joint Video Experts Team (JVET) of VCEG and MPEG, with a target of finalization by the end of the year 2020. Three categories of video are addressed: Standard dynamic range video (SDR), high dynamic range video (HDR), and 360° video. While SDR and HDR cover variants of conventional video to be displayed e.g. on a suitable TV screen at very high resolution (UHD), the 360° category targets at videos capturing a full-degree surround view of the scene. This enables an immersive video experience with the possibility to look around in the rendered scene, e.g. when viewed using a head-mounted display. This application triggers various technical challenges which need to be addressed in terms of compression, encoding, transport, and rendering. The talk summarizes the current state of the complete standardization project. Focussing on the SDR and 360° video categories, it highlights the development of selected coding tools compared to the state of the art. Representative examples of the new technological challenges as well as corresponding proposed solutions are presented.

Wien_webBio: Mathias Wien received the Diploma and Dr.-Ing. degrees from RWTH Aachen University, Germany, in 1997 and 2004, respectively. He currently works as a senior research scientist, head of administration, and lecturer, at the Institute of Communication Engineering of RWTH Aachen University, Germany. His research interests include image and video processing, immersive, space-frequency adaptive and scalable video compression, and robust video transmission. With respect to standardization, Mathias has contributed to ITU-T VCEG, ISO/IEC MPEG, as well as their collaborative teams, the Joint Video Experts Team, the Joint Collaborative Team on Video Coding (JCT-VC), and the Joint Video Team (JVT), in the standardization work towards the successor of HEVC, HEVC, and AVC, respectively. In standardization, he has co-chaired and coordinated several AdHoc groups as well as tool- and core experiments. He has authored and co-authored more than 60 conference and journal papers in the area of video coding,  as well as 18 granted patents. He has published the Springer textbook “High Efficiency Video Coding: Coding Tools and Specification”, which fully covers Version 1 of HEVC. Mathias is a member of the IEEE Signal Processing Society and the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society.

Links:

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Evaluating Recommender Systems for Software Engineers – Lessons Learned

Massimiliano Di Penta | April 4, 2018 | 13:30 | E 2.42

Abstract: The availability of a wide variety of software repositories, ranging from Questions and Answer forums to mailing lists, forges and issue trackers opens the road for building recommender systems aimed at supporting developers in their activities. Upon evaluating such recommenders, in most cases researchers focus on the underlying approach capability of providing accurate and complete results.
In this seminar I will report our experience in evaluating recommenders, showing that an offline evaluation of the approach precision and recall is only a very preliminary starting point. Importantly, different kinds of evaluations having different size and level of control, and above all involving humans, are required to achieve results able to convince practitioners of the actual usefulness and applicability of a tool. Moreover, I will discuss how context plays a paramount role in the empirical evaluation of recommender systems.

dipentaBio: Massimiliano Di Penta is associate professor at the University of Sannio, Italy. His research interests include software maintenance and evolution, mining software repositories, empirical software engineering, search-based software engineering, and testing. He is author of over 250 papers appeared in international journals, conferences and workshops, and received various awards for his research and reviewing activity, including two most influential paper awards (SANER 2017 and GECCO 2015) and three ACM SIGSOFT Distinguished Paper Awards (ICSE, FSE and ASE). He serves and has served in the organizing and program committees of over 100 conferences such as ICSE, FSE, ASE, ICSME, ICST, MSR, SANER, ICPC, GECCO, WCRE, and others. He is currently member of the steering committee of ICSME, MSR, and PROMISE. Previously, he has been steering committee member of other conferences, including ICPC, SSBSE, CSMR, SCAM, and WCRE. He is in the editorial board of ACM Transactions on Software Engineering and Methodology, the Empirical Software Engineering Journal edited by Springer, and of the Journal of Software: Evolution and Processes edited by Wiley. He has served the editorial board of IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering.

Links:

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Review: Is Your Software Development Process Green? [Slides]

The review of the TEWI colloquia of Csaba Szabó from February 7, 2018 comprises the slides.

Slides:

Abstract

Like with Bio products, the world is developing to become a more nature-aware ecosystem. The green initiative defines two main goals: reduce energy consumption and use basic natural sources in electrical energy production.

This lecture focuses on energy consumption of working software and its development processes, where each development phase plays a significant role. Considering any software development process, the energy is being consumed while problem analysis, constructing and evaluating the code as well. Software or hardware tools have to be used to implement energy consumption monitoring for software run at the top of selected operating systems and for evaluation of the energy consumption. Usual usage scenarios are to monitor energy usage of selected software. We will also look at the possibility to use these tools to measure how green is the process that produced the programs.

CV

CsabaCsaba SZABÓ is Assistant Professor at the Dept. of Computers and Informatics of the Fac. of Electrical Engineering and Informatics (FEEaI) at Technical University of Kosice. He graduated (MSc.) with distinction at the Dept. of Computers and Informatics of the Fac. of Electrical Engineering and Informatics (FEEaI) at Technical University of Kosice in 2003. He obtained his PhD. in Program- and Information Systems at the FEEaI at Technical University of Kosice in 2007. Since 2006 he is affiliated with the Dept. of Computers and Informatics, FEEaI, Technical University of Kosice. Currently he is involved in research in the field of behavioral description of software, information systems and web services, software and test evolution, and testing and evaluation of software.

He is a member of the John von Neumann Computer Society (NJSZT, Hungary) and the Slovak Society for Applied Cybernetics and Informatics (SSAKI). Currently he is also leading the ERASMUS+ KA203 – Strategic partnership for higher education project No. 2017-1-SK01-KA203-035402: „Focusing Education on Composability, Comprehensibility and Correctness of Working Software“.

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Is Your Process Development Process Green?

Ing. Csaba Szabó PhD. | February 7, 2018 | 10 am | L1.0.14

Abstract

Like with Bio products, the world is developing to become a more nature-aware ecosystem. The green initiative defines two main goals: reduce energy consumption and use basic natural sources in electrical energy production.

This lecture focuses on energy consumption of working software and its development processes, where each development phase plays a significant role. Considering any software development process, the energy is being consumed while problem analysis, constructing and evaluating the code as well. Software or hardware tools have to be used to implement energy consumption monitoring for software run at the top of selected operating systems and for evaluation of the energy consumption. Usual usage scenarios are to monitor energy usage of selected software. We will also look at the possibility to use these tools to measure how green is the process that produced the programs.

CV

CsabaCsaba SZABÓ is Assistant Professor at the Dept. of Computers and Informatics of the Fac. of Electrical Engineering and Informatics (FEEaI) at Technical University of Kosice. He graduated (MSc.) with distinction at the Dept. of Computers and Informatics of the Fac. of Electrical Engineering and Informatics (FEEaI) at Technical University of Kosice in 2003. He obtained his PhD. in Program- and Information Systems at the FEEaI at Technical University of Kosice in 2007. Since 2006 he is affiliated with the Dept. of Computers and Informatics, FEEaI, Technical University of Kosice. Currently he is involved in research in the field of behavioral description of software, information systems and web services, software and test evolution, and testing and evaluation of software.

He is a member of the John von Neumann Computer Society (NJSZT, Hungary) and the Slovak Society for Applied Cybernetics and Informatics (SSAKI). Currently he is also leading the ERASMUS+ KA203 – Strategic partnership for higher education project No. 2017-1-SK01-KA203-035402: „Focusing Education on Composability, Comprehensibility and Correctness of Working Software“.

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Review: Affective Personalization: from Psychology to Algorithms [Slides]

The review of the TEWI colloquia ofDr. Marko Tkalčič from December 21, 2017 comprises the slides.

Slides:

Abstract

The talk will cover the research carried out by the author in the domain of psychologically-driven personalized systems. In order to be truly personalized a system needs to understand the user. Current systems employ data-driven models, such as recommendations based on past ratings, clicks or purchases. However, psychologically-grounded models appear to have potential for better personalized systems. The author will cover models of emotions and personality, the unobtrusive acquisition thereof through social media crawling, video processing and machine learning and their use in personalization algorithms.

Bio

tkalcicMarko Tkalčič is Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Computer Science at the Free University in Bolzano, Italy. He received his PhD from the Faculty of Electrical Engineering at the University of Ljubljana in 2011. After a postdoc at the University of Ljubljana, he worked as a postdoc at the Johannes Kepler University in Linz, Austria from 2013 to 2015. From 2016 he is with the Free University of Bolzano. His research explores ways in which psychologically-motivated user characteristics, such as emotions and personality, can be used to improve personalized systems. It employs methods such as user studies and machine learning.

Dr. Tkalčič has published in prestigious journals, such as Elsevier Information Sciences and Springer UMUAI. He has presented at venues, such as RecSys and UMAP. Recently he edited the book Emotions and Personality in Personalized Systems with Springer. He is active in organizing conferences (RecSys 2017, UMAP 2017) and workshops (EMPIRE, SOAP, HUMANIZE), editing special issues, and reviewing for prestigious journals, conferences and grant bodies. He is a member of the editorial board of the UMUAI journal.

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Affective Personalization: from Psychology to Algorithms

Dr. Marko Tkalčič | December 21, 2017 | 3 pm | E.1.05

Abstract

The talk will cover the research carried out by the author in the domain of psychologically-driven personalized systems. In order to be truly personalized a system needs to understand the user. Current systems employ data-driven models, such as recommendations based on past ratings, clicks or purchases. However, psychologically-grounded models appear to have potential for better personalized systems. The author will cover models of emotions and personality, the unobtrusive acquisition thereof through social media crawling, video processing and machine learning and their use in personalization algorithms.

Bio

tkalcicMarko Tkalčič is Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Computer Science at the Free University in Bolzano, Italy. He received his PhD from the Faculty of Electrical Engineering at the University of Ljubljana in 2011. After a postdoc at the University of Ljubljana, he worked as a postdoc at the Johannes Kepler University in Linz, Austria from 2013 to 2015. From 2016 he is with the Free University of Bolzano. His research explores ways in which psychologically-motivated user characteristics, such as emotions and personality, can be used to improve personalized systems. It employs methods such as user studies and machine learning.

Dr. Tkalčič has published in prestigious journals, such as Elsevier Information Sciences and Springer UMUAI. He has presented at venues, such as RecSys and UMAP. Recently he edited the book Emotions and Personality in Personalized Systems with Springer. He is active in organizing conferences (RecSys 2017, UMAP 2017) and workshops (EMPIRE, SOAP, HUMANIZE), editing special issues, and reviewing for prestigious journals, conferences and grant bodies. He is a member of the editorial board of the UMUAI journal.

 

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On Digitalized Electrical Energy Systems: Emerging Cyber Security Threats and Mitigations

Dr. Paul Smith | December 5, 2017 | 14.00 p.m. | E.1.42

Abstract

To enable the increased integration of renewable energy sources and the creation of new energy services, our electrical energy systems are being digitalized (i.e., we are creating the so-called smart grid). This digitalization has many potential benefits, but it also introduces new cyber security vulnerabilities that could be exploited by malicious actors. In this talk, we will look at a relatively new form of threat that uses advanced attack techniques to achieve a malicious goal, which results in disruption to power supply. The most notable example of this form of threat took place in the Ukraine in December 2015. Having looked at this threat, the talk will continue by giving an overview of a number of solutions that were developed in the EU-funded SPARKS project (https://project-sparks.eu). The talk will conclude with a discussion on future research directions.

Bio

Dr. Paul Smith is a Senior Scientist in the Center for Digital Safety and Security at AIT Austrian Institute of Technology.
He received his PhD in Computing from Lancaster University, UK in September 2003. Paul’s research is targeted at developing applied solutions to ensuring the security and resilience of critical information infrastructures. More specifically, in recent years, his researched has focused on securing future digitalized energy systems. Solutions have focused on approaches to risk management, anomaly detection, secure architecture specification, incident response, and resilience measurement. For each of these, his interests lie in understanding cyber-physical aspects of security and resilience. He has participated in a number of international research projects in this area, and has published articles on various aspects that relate to this core interest.

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Antenna arrays for radio localization and communication area synthesis

Dr. Daniele Inserra | August 22, 2017 | 10.00 a.m. | B04, L4.1.01

Abstract

Antenna arrays have gained considerable interest in the last decades due to their advantage of increasing system coverage, capacity, throughput, and link quality, hence improving communication system performance. On the other hand, an antenna array can also be used to provide spatial diversity, beamforming capabilities, or implementing Direction of Arrival (DoA)-based positioning systems. Obviously, all of these systems manifest performance strongly dependent on the antenna array design.

In this lecture, two of these antenna array applications are treated and described. Firstly, the problem of radio localization based on DoA estimation is analyzed under the hypothesis that DoA estimation capability can be integrated in a general communication system data processing path. A specific case of cyclic prefixing (CP) orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) transmission technique with training sequence is assumed to show fundamental limits of the proposed approach in a communication channel impaired by multipath components.

In the second part, antenna array is exploited to accurately control the radiation pattern and synthesize a specific communication area on a planar surface. Communication area synthesis, defined as a space portion limited by a power threshold, is described as an important requirement in the design of radio frequency identification (RFID)-based electronic toll collection (ETC) systems, or other specific vehicular applications which require a high data-rate service spatial area.

Bio

InserraDaniele Inserra received the BSc Degree (2007) and the MSc Degree (2009, summa cum laude) in electrical engineering, and the Ph.D. degree in industrial and information engineering (2013), all from the University of Udine, Udine, Italy. He was a member of the Wireless and Power Line Communications Lab at the University of Udine until 2013. From 2013 to 2014 he was with Calzavara S.p.a., Italy, as responsible of the Non Ionizing Radiation Laboratory measurement activities and as a member of the technical staff (antennas and electromagnetic compatibility designer). Currently, he is a postdoctoral researcher with the University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, China. His research interests include antenna array design, wireless communication systems, radio localization and positioning techniques, hardware/software co-design, rapid prototyping methodologies, hardware and RF devices characterization and measurement systems.

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