Impedance sensors and applications for multiphase flow monitoring

Dr.-Ing. Marco Jose da Silva | June 12, 2017 | 02.00 p.m. | L4.1.01

Abstract

The simultaneous stream of two of more substances denoted as multiphase flow is commonly encountered in many industrial applications, among others in nuclear, chemical and petroleum industry. The monitoring of such flow is required to assure safety and/or efficiency of industrial processes and equipment. For this reason, in the past a number of sensors and instrumentation to monitor multiphase flow have developed and applied. Impedance sensors, in which the measurand causes a variation of an electrical property such as resistance or capacitance, are promising candidates for the measurement of flow parameters of multiphase mixtures.

In this talk, an overview on selected impedance-based measurement techniques and sensors applied to the measurement of multiphase flows with emphasis in the field of petroleum production is given. First, typical scenario of onshore and offshore oil production systems along with typical requirements on sensors and instrumentation are given. Then, different sensor and instrumentation developed at UTFPR are presented as well as some typical application is shown. Hence, beginning with simple impedance probes up to tomographic (multi-electrode) sensors will be described and discussed.

Bio

De SilvaMarco Jose da Silva received the Dr.-Ing. degree in Electrical Engineering from Dresden University of Technology, Germany, in 2008. From 2004 to 2009 he was a Research Associate with Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Germany. In Year 2010, he joined the Federal University of Technology-Parana (UTFPR), Brazil, as Assistant Professor. From 2013, he is an Associate Professor (tenured) at the Department of Electrical Engineering (CPGEI) and since 2016 he also is co-Director of the Multiphase Flow Center (NUEM) at UTFPR. His research interests include measurement technology, sensors, and instrumentation applied to fluid flow. He is the author of over 150 scientific international journals and conference papers and was granted 3 patents. Dr. Da Silva is Topical (Senior) Editor of IEEE Sensors Journal and Associate Editor of Journal of Sensors and Sensor Systems.

Posted in TEWI-Kolloquium | Leave a comment

The Evolution of Programming Languages and Computer Architectures over the Last 50 Years

Prof. Niklaus Wirth | June 12, 2017 | 04.00 p.m. | E.2.42

Abstract

We recount the development of procedural programming languages and of computer architectures, beginning with Algol 60 and the main frame computers, and discuss the influence of the former on the latter. We point out the major innovative features of computers, and the main characteristics of languages. What makes languages high-level, and what caused their cancerous growth and overwhelming complexity? Are we stuck with the monsters, or is further, sound development still possible?

Bio

Wirth_Niklaus

© Peter Badge/Typos1 – in coop. with HLFF – all rights reserved 2017

Niklaus Wirth is one of the most influential computer scientists ever. He is known first of all for his works in programming language and compiler design, but he has also contributed a lot to hardware and operating system design and software engineering in a general sense. He spent most of his working time as professor at the ETH Zürich, but spent also several years in outstanding research institutions in the USA (e.g. Xerox PARC) and Canada.

His best known programming language is Pascal. Pascal was published at the end of the sixties, at a time, when on the one side widely used but theoretically poorly founded languages (such as Fortran and Cobol) and on the other hand theoretically exaggerated and practically hardly useful languages (such as Algol-68) dominated the scene. Wirth succeeded with Pascal to find the happy medium. This was the first programming language 1) incorporating the sound theory of safe programming (as defined by E.W. Dijkstra, C.A. Hoare and others, including Wirth himself); 2) applying strict, static type checking; 3) providing a flexible system of recursive type constructors. In other words: Strictness, regarding syntax, but freedom in expressing semantics. In later languages Wirth adapted the concept of encapsulation and information hiding (Modula and Modula-2), and object-orientation (Oberon and Oberon-2) in a novel, clean and simple way. Oberon was not only the name of a language, but also of an extremely compact, but extendible operating system, enabling – among others – maybe the first efficient garbage collector of the world. He designed also a hardware architecture, best fitting for the requirements of code generation from compilers (the Lilith architecture) becoming thus a pioneer for later RISC architectures. He also designed a simple and compact language for hardware design (LOLA). The leading principle in all his work was the slogan taken from Albert Einstein: “Make it as simple as possible – but not simpler!”

Niklaus Wirth published over 10 books and numerous scientific papers. He was for a few years the most quoted computer scientist at all. He received practically all awards a computer scientists can get. First of all, the Turing Award, which is often called “the Nobel prize for computer scientists”. He is a member of the order Pour le mérite for science and art and of the German Academy of Sciences, he received the IEEE Computer Pioneer Award, the Outstanding Research Award in Software Engineering von ACM Sigsoft – and a lot of others.

Niklaus Wirth is an excellent speaker; humble, wise and with a lot of sense of humor. This makes his talks for an unforgettable event for this audience. The Institute of Information Technology at the Klagenfurt University is highly honored and pleased that he accepted our invitation.

Registration needed:
martina@itec.aau.at

Posted in TEWI-Kolloquium | Leave a comment

Electro-mechanical reliability of flexible electronics: an overview of testing and characterization techniques

Dr. Oleksandr Glushko | June 1, 2017 | 10.00 a.m. | V.1.34

Abstract

Fabrication of electronic devices on flexible polymer substrates is a new and constantly growing branch in microelectronics industry. The main advantages of flexible electronics are light-weight and ultra-thin design, possibility of large area roll-to-roll production as well as outstanding mechanical properties such as stretchability or bendability. For realization of these advantages within a final device not only development of novel appropriate materials and fabrication methods but also understanding of reliability issues and failure mechanisms are required.

In this presentation an overview of main mechanical test concepts along with the description of important reliability parameters which can be gained from these tests will be given. The cornerstone of materials testing – the monotonic tensile test – is used to characterize the general structural integrity of a film, to determine the crack onset strain and ductility but also to estimate the film-substrate adhesion. Cyclic tensile (fatigue) test is a well-established method to examine the stability of thin film components when small amounts of mechanical strain are repeatedly applied. Examples of different types of damage which develops with the increasing cycle number as well as the methods for fatigue life estimation will be shown. Finally, bending tests are required to prove the mechanical performance under conditions which closely simulate the real usage conditions of a flexible electronic device. The stability and fracture of different metallization lines during repeated bending will be systematically overviewed.

A special emphasize on the correlation between mechanical damage and the degradation of electrical conductivity will be made throughout the talk. In particular, it will be shown that formation and propagation of cracks in the film does not always lead to the electrical failure. At the end of the talk several suggestions for failure-free design of flexible electronics from the perspective of a mechanical engineer will be given.

Bio

photo_meOleksandr Glushko had received his PhD degree at the Montanuniversität Leoben in the area of photonic metamaterials in 2011. Afterwards he entered the Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science where he started implementation of coupled electro-mechanical testing methods for reliability characterization of thin conductive films on polymer substrates. Currently he is a project leader at the Erich Schmid Institute investigating different fundamental and applied problems of thin film reliability. The fundamental research areas cover the mechanisms of microplasticity, room-temperature grain coarsening and strain-induced grain boundary migration. The applied scientific areas of interest are the correlation between mechanical damage and electrical degradation of polymer metallization, optimization of microstructure and geometry of conductive lines as well as development of new reliability test concepts for flexible electronics applications.

Posted in TEWI-Kolloquium | Leave a comment

Energy for development in Mauritania: culture, political and behavioral challenges

Tamer Khatib, Ph.D, | May 23, 2017 | 03.00 p.m.| Lakeside Labs, B4.1.114

Abstract

In late 2016, Tamer Khatib has led the energy mission of the Islamic Bank for Development to Mauritania. The mission aimed to learn about energy status in the country and draft a road map for energy development project. The mission was supposed to collaborate with the Mauritania government in the capital Nouakchott. However, the mission has faced many challenges in having this collaboration on ground due to faults done by the mission at the beginning in terms of communication and presentation. In this lecture Tamer will share the experience of working in Africa in the field of energy development including official communication, culture barriers and other political issues.

Bio

TamerTamer is a photovoltaic power systems professional. He holds a B.Sc. degree in electrical power systems from An-Najah National University, Palestine as well as a M.Sc. degree and a Ph.D degree in photovoltaic power systems from National University of Malaysia, Malaysia. In addition he holds Habilitation (the highest academic degree in German speaking countries) in Renewable and sustainable energy from Alpen Adria Universitat, Klagenfurt, Austria.
Currently he is an Assistant professor of renewable energy at An-Najah National University and IEEE Palestine sub-section chair. In addition he is a Privatdozent in Renewable Energy at Alpen Adria Universitat, Klagenfurt, Austria.
So far, he has 2 patents, 3 books and 100 research articles, while  his current h-index is 23. He has supervised 4 Ph.D researches, 8 master researches and 35 bachelor researches.
He is a senior member of IEEE, IEEE Power and Energy Society, The International Solar Energy society, Jordanian Engineers Association, Palestinian Solar and Sustainable Energy Association and International Association of Engineers.
His research interests mainly fall in the scope of photovoltaic systems and solar energy fundamentals. These interests include PV systems design and optimization, modeling and control of PV systems, hybrid PV/Wind systems, hybrid PV/diesel systems, Grid connected PV systems, sun trackers, MPPT technology, inverters in PV system, solar chargers, batteries and charge controllers, solar energy fundamentals, solar energy prediction, AI applications for solar energy and PV systems, wind power systems, wind chargers, wind energy modeling and prediction.

Posted in TEWI-Kolloquium | Leave a comment

Programmieren ist was für Mädchen

Linda Fernsel | 13. Mai 2017 | 9:30 Uhr | L 1.0.14

Kurzfassung

Nur 20% aller Informatikstudierenden sind Frauen. Aber nicht weil Programmieren nichts für Frauen ist. Das Problem beginnt in den Köpfen der Gesellschaft und manifestiert sich im Informatikunterricht, der großen Einfluss auf die Entscheidung zu einem Informatikstudium haben kann. In der Online Community der Programmiersprache Scratch sind Mädchen mit Jungen fast gleich auf. Was können wir von Scratch lernen, um Informatikunterricht für alle zu machen und so Chancengleichheit zu schaffen?

Bio

Linda Fernsel Scratch Konferenz 2016Linda Fernsel ist seit 2015 Community Moderator und damit Teil des Scratch Teams. Sie kümmert sich um die Online Gemeinschaft von Scratch. Weil sie Scratch für so viele Menschen wie möglich zugänglich machen will engagiert sie sich in CoderDojos, Scratch Wikis und Scratch Konferenzen. Wenn sie gerade nicht mit Scratch beschäftigt ist studiert sie Internationale Medieninformatik im Bachelor an der Hochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft in Berlin.

Posted in TEWI-Kolloquium | Leave a comment

Advances and challenges in vision science

Dr. Oge Marques | May 22, 2017 | 16:00 | E.2.42

Abstract

This talk provides an overview of the interdisciplinary science of vision, with emphasis on meaningful open problems in human and computer vision and contemporary approaches for solving such problems. It highlights selected challenges involved in understanding, modeling, and simulating human vision mechanisms; compares and contrasts the human vision system and computer vision systems designed to achieve comparable functionality; and contextualizes the latest advances in computer vision, artificial intelligence, and deep learning and their impact on the advancement of vision science. Moreover, it presents correlations between vision science and selected aspects of cognitive neurosciences, artificial intelligence, and representative works of art.

MarquesOge Marques (http://faculty.eng.fau.edu/omarques/) is Professor of Computer and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Florida Atlantic University (FAU) (Boca Raton, Florida). He has more than 25 years of teaching and research experience in the fields of image processing and computer vision. His research interests are in the area of intelligent processing of visual information, which combines the fields of image processing, computer vision, image retrieval, machine learning, serious games, and human visual perception. He is the (co-) author of two patents, more than 100 refereed journal and conference papers, and several books in these topics, including the textbook Practical Image and Video Processing Using MATLAB (Wiley-IEEE Press, 2011). He is a Tau Beta Pi Eminent Engineer, a Senior Member of both the ACM and the IEEE and a member of the honor societies of Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi, and Upsilon Pi Epsilon.

Posted in TEWI-Kolloquium | Leave a comment

Scratch im professionellen Einsatz! Eine Game Designerin berichtet.

Johanna Janiszewski | 13. Mai 2017 | 9:00 Uhr | L 1.0.14

Scratch ist eine Programmiersprache mit einem einsteigerfreundlichen Design und wird deshalb häufig als sehr kindlich und nur für Anfänger geeignet betrachtet. Und sobald Kinder sich ein wenig damit vertraut gemacht haben, wird rasch von ihnen gefordert, auf eine “professionellere” Programmiersprache umsteigen. Dabei bietet Scratch viel Raum für großartige Ideen deren Umsetzung weit über ein paar kleine Programmierübungen hinausgeht. Auf der Scratch-Seite findet man Beispiele, was damit möglich ist. Manche kennen vielleicht den Scratcher Griffpatch, der berühmte Spiele wie “Terraria” oder “Geometry Dash” auf Scratch nachgebaut und auch einige sehr tolle eigene Ideen entwickelt hat. Bei meiner Arbeit als Game Designerin entwickle ich zwar selten komplette Spiele in Scratch, aber ich benutze Scratch, um verrückte Ideen auszuprobieren und Prototypen zu entwickeln.  In diesem Vortrag gebe ich einen kurzen Einblick in meinem Arbeitsalltag im Game Design und zeige anhand von ein paar Beispielen, wie man Scratch darin einsetzen kann.

JaniszewskiJohanna Janiszewski (geb. Jacob) ist freiberufliche Game Designerin und Geschäftsführerin von „Tiny Crocodile Studios“ in Berlin. Ihr Debüt im Bereich der Digitalen Spiele machte sie 2008 mit Simon the Sorcerer 5 für Silver Style Entertainment. Derzeit arbeitet Sie an einem an „Schatzaffen“, einem Edutainment-Spiel für Kinder und spielfreudige Personen das Geometrie spielerisch vermittelt. Daneben bietet sie auch Kurse im Bereich der  Spieleentwicklung an. In ihrer Freizeit vermittelt sie Kindern mit grafischen Programmiersprachen wie „Scratch“, „App Inventor“ oder „Pocket Code“ die Grundlagen der Programmierung und Spieleentwicklung.

Posted in TEWI-Kolloquium | Leave a comment

Predicting the “Stars of Tomorrow” on Social Media

Prof. Wen-Huang Cheng | May 10, 2017 | 10:00 | E.2.42

Abstract

People are interested in predicting the future. For example, which films will bomb or who will win the upcoming Grammy awards? Making predictions about the future is not only fun matters but can bring real value to those who correctly predict the course of world events, such as which stocks are the best purchases for short-term gains. Predictive analytics is thus a field that has attracted major attention in both academia and the industry. As social media has become an inseparable part of modern life, there has been increasing interest in research of leveraging and exploiting social media as an information source for inferring rich social facts and knowledge. In this talk, we will address an interesting and challenging problem in social media research, i.e., predicting social media popularity. We aim to discover which image posts on social media are the “stars of tomorrow”, those will be the most engaging for social media audiences, e.g., receiving the most likes. Sociological finding and our novel solutions to effectively develop a structured modeling for popularity dynamics will be presented.

Wen-Huang ChengWen-Huang Cheng received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in computer science and information engineering from National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, in 2002 and 2004, respectively, where he received the Ph.D. (Hons.) degree from the Graduate Institute of Networking and Multimedia in 2008. He is an Associate Research Fellow (Associate Professor) with the Research Center for Information Technology Innovation (CITI), Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, where he is the Founding Leader with the Multimedia Computing Laboratory (MCLab), CITI, and an Associate Research Fellow with a joint appointment in the Institute of Information Science. Before joining Academia Sinica, he was a Principal Researcher with MagicLabs, HTC Corporation, Taoyuan, Taiwan, from 2009 to 2010. His current research interests include multimedia content analysis, multimedia big data, deep learning, computer vision, mobile multimedia computing, social media, and human computer interaction. He has received numerous research awards, including the 2016 Y. Z. Hsu Scientific Paper Award, the 2015-2016 Presidential Achievement Award of Rotary International, the Outstanding Youth Electrical Engineer Award from the Chinese Institute of Electrical Engineering in 2015, the Top 10% Paper Award from the 2015 IEEE International Workshop on Multimedia Signal Processing, the Outstanding Reviewer Award from the 2015 ACM International Conference on Internet Multimedia Computing and Service, the Prize Award of Multimedia Grand Challenge from the 2014 ACM Multimedia Conference, the K. T. Li Young Researcher Award from the ACM Taipei/Taiwan Chapter in 2014, the Outstanding Young Scholar Awards from the Ministry of Science and Technology in 2014 and 2012, the Outstanding Social Youth of Taipei Municipal in 2014, the Best Reviewer Award from the 2013 Pacific-Rim Conference on Multimedia, and the Best Poster Paper Award from the 2012 International Conference on 3D Systems and Applications. He is APSIPA Distinguished Lecturer.

Posted in TEWI-Kolloquium | Leave a comment

Existence, Uniqueness, and Utility of an Analytic Parahermitian Matrix EVD

Dr. Stephan Alexander Weiss | April 26, 2017 | 14:00 | B04, L4101

Abstract

The eigenvalue decomposition of a Hermitian matrix has favourable properties, which have been exploited for a variety of optimal solutions to narrowband problems. We will explore the extension to space-time covariance matrices that can capture the 2nd order statistics of broadband problems; their z-transform has a parahermitian structure, which extends the Hermitian property to matrices of functions. To investigate such a parahermitian matrix EVD,  first we will look towards the unit circle via an analytic EVD, before we investigate off the unit-circle with the ultimate aim to establish a time-domain solution. We will gain some insight into the problems and feasibility  of established polynomial matrix EVD algorithms, that despite a number of successful algorithms with proven convergence tend to result in high-order factorisations. I will conclude by showing some toy problems where a polynomial approach admits simple solutions that a Fourier approach cannot yield.

Bio

WeissI am a Reader at the University of Strathclyde (Glasgow, Scotland), and head the Centre for Signal and Image Processing (7 academic staff and some 40 researchers and PhD students). The above topic is closely tied to my homes: Scotland through the work of Colin MacLaurin, and Germany through Karl Weierstrass‘ and Franz Rellich’s contributions.

Posted in TEWI-Kolloquium | Leave a comment

A Behavior-based Approach to Secure and Resilient Industrial Control Systems

Dr. Dimitrios Serpanos | March 9, 2017 | 12:30 | E.2.37

Abstract

Industrial control systems (ICS) control and manage a significant portion of critical infrastructure. As cyberattacks increasingly target critical infrastructure, ICS security and resilience are required to avoid catastrophic events that may lead even to loss of life. Importantly, ICS differ from traditional IT systems in several ways, from interacting with physical processes to requirements for continuous operation and real-time processing.

In this talk, we present a behavior-based approach to the design of secure and resilient industrial control systems. Starting with a programmable specification of a control process, we develop executable code with specified security properties. A run-time middleware, ARMET, monitors the execution of the program, identifying behavioral deviations due to intrusions or process failures and leading to diagnosis and system recovery. Importantly, our approach includes a novel method for vulnerability analysis of processes.

DimitriDimitrios Serpanos is Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras and Director of the Industrial Systems Institute in Greece. He has worked at IBM Research, on the faculties of the University of Crete and the University of Patras, as Principal Scientist at QCRI, as President of the University of Western Greece, and has served another term as Director of the Industrial Systems Institute. He holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Princeton University. His research is in embedded systems, industrial systems and security.
Professor Serpanos has co-authored several books and published research work extensively. His research has been funded by both the European Commission, the Greek Government and industry in the EU and the USA.

Posted in TEWI-Kolloquium | Leave a comment