Die Welt aus Schwingungen zusammensetzen!

Prof. Dr. Johannes Huber | 5. September 2019 | 16:00 Uhr | B04.1.06

Zum 250. Geburtstag von Joseph Fourier

Kurzfassung:

Der französische Mathematiker und Physiker Joseph Fourier (1768 – 1830) erkannte, dass jede mathematische Funktion in einem begrenzten Definitionsbereich durch eine Summe von sinus-Schwingungen approximierbar ist, was nicht zuletzt für die Ingenieurwissenschaften von eminenter Bedeutung ist. Im Vortrag wird zunächst versucht, die Grundaussagen der Theorie allgemeinverständlich zu veranschaulichen. Anmerkungen zum Empfinden von Wohlklang und Dissonanz in der Musik anhand der Fourier-Reihenentwicklung von Schallwellen sowie hochaktuelle Erkenntnisse von Fourier zum Treibhauseffekt der Erdatmosphäre aus dem Jahr 1827 ergänzen den Vortrag.

Bio:

Johannes Huber studierte Elektrotechnik an der Technischen Universität München und erwarb 1977 das Diplom. Er wurde 1982 zur Dr.-Ing. promoviert und erhielt 1991 den Titel Dr.-Ing. habil. mit einer Monographie zur Trelliscodierung. Von 1991 bis März 2017 war er Inhaber des Lehrstuhls für Informationsübertragung an der Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg. Seit April 2017 ist er Prof. em. am Institute for Digital Communications (IDC) dieser Universität. Von 2007 bis 2009 war er Dekan der Technischen Fakultät.

In der Forschung ist Johannes Huber auf den Gebieten digitale Übertragung, Informations- und Codierungstheorie, codierte Modulation, Entzerrungs- und Detektionsverfahren, MIMO-Übertragungsverfahren, DSL etc. aktiv. Er hat zwei Monographien verfasst und ist Autor und Co-Autor von ca. 340 wissenschaftlichen Veröffentlichungen. In den Jahren 1988, 2000 und 2006 wurden Publikationen, die er verfasst bzw. mit verfasst hat, mit dem Preis der deutschen informationstechnischen Gesellschaft ausgezeichnet. 2004 erhielt er den Innovationspreis der Vodafone-Stiftung für Mobilfunk und in den Jahren 2003 und 2010 wurde ihm der EEEfCOM Innovationspreis verliehen.

Prof. Huber ist Fellow of the IEEE, Corresponding Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh und ordentliches Mitglied der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften (BAdW). An der BAdW leitet er die Kommission „Forum Technologie“ und ist stellvertretender Sprecher der Sektion III: Naturwissenschaften, Mathematik, Technikwissenschaften

Inzwischen sind 11 seiner ehemaligen Doktoranden selbst Professoren an namhaften Universitäten und Hochschulen.

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Swarm Robotics – A Formal Approach

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Heiko Hamann | July 8, 2019 | 15:00 | B02.2.05

Abstract:
In similar style to the book of the same title we try to understand how to design large-scale robot systems by going through several example scenarios on topics such as aggregation, task allocation, self-assembly, collective decision-making, and collective construction. We study the methodology behind building multiple, simple robots and how the complexity emerges from multiple interactions between these robots such that they are able to solve difficult tasks.

CV:
Heiko Hamann received his doctorate in engineering from the University of Karlsruhe, Germany in 2008. He did his postdoctoral training in modular robotics and evolutionary robotics at the Zoology department of the University of Graz, Austria. From 2013 to 2017 he was assistant professor of swarm robotics at the University of Paderborn, Germany. Since 2017 he is full professor for service robotics at the University of Lübeck, Germany. His main research interests are swarm robotics, evolutionary robotics, and modeling of complex systems.

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MEMS microfabrication-part 2: Back-end

Dr. Ali Roshanghias | June 25, 2019 | 10:30 | B04.1.06

Abstract:

In this talk, the back-end processing and integration technologies of MEMS devices will be addressed. Unlike electronics IC packaging, MEMS packaging in not well-established, is expensive (up to 80% of the product total cost and is custom-built. Here, we will introduce the basics of MEMS packaging in different levels of integrations. The common backend processes will be covered in this talk such as wafer dicing, wafer thinning, wafer bonding, molding and over-molding, die-attach, solder bumping and wire bonding, etc. We will also briefly introduce the state of the art and future trends of MEMS packaging and some terminologies such as 3D integration with and without TSVs, FOLWP, C2C, C2W, W2W, SiP, SiB, for MEMS integration will be described.

CV:

Dr. Ali Roshanghias is currently a senior researcher and project manager in the field of MEMS packaging at CTR Carinthian Tech Research AG. He recieved his PhD in materials science and technology from Sharif university of technology, Iran at 2012. Afterwards he pursued his career as a post-doc fellow at Nagaoka university of technology, Japan and Vienna universtity, Austria in the field of electronic materials and packaging. In 2015 he joined the CTR Carinthian Tech Research, Austria as a material scientist in the field of heterogeneous integration technologies and MEMS/ Power packaging. He has published over 30 papers on materials synthesis and characterization and is a verified peer-reviewer of Elsevier science.

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On-the-fly Collaboration for Legacy Business Process Systems in An Open Service Environment

Prof. Liang ZHANG (Leon) Ph.D | July 5, 2019 | 10:00 | S.2.69

Abstract:

Dynamic, distributed and open business forces enterprises to support various critical requirements, such as, timely reacting to changes, properly reusing business assets and smoothly collaborating with external partners. Existing approaches focus on mechanisms dealing with heterogeneity, but there is a lack of frameworks enabling legacy business processes performing collaboration in an open service environment. This paper proposes the L2L service framework featuring reactive IoT event messaging and coordinator-based collaborating between autonomous enterprises. Along with the emerging of coordinators, L2L empowers on-the-fly business process collaboration with dynamic changes. We present our experiments with a real-world scenario from the shipping industry of China.

CV:

Liang Zhang is a Professor of Computer Science at Fudan University, China. He received B.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science from Wuhan University, China. He has published over 70 journal and conference papers concerning multimedia databases, digital library, web services, and recently business process management (BPM). He is a Steering Committee Member of ICSOC, and has been the PC co-Chair of ICSOC 2013, General co-Chair of ICSOC 2012, publicity co-chair of BPM 2011, program co-chair of CBPM 2011, and NDBC 2011. His current research interests include XaaS infrastructure for CPS, and collaborative workflows for instant virtual organizations. He has been collaborating with Jianwen Su’s group at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Jian Yang’s group at Macquarie University, and Marlon Dumas at Tartu University. Recently, he collaborates with Prof. Hong-Linh Truong Aalto University, Finland, for IoT/BPM integration research. Dr. Zhang’s research has been supported by NSFC and other national agencies.

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Teaching about AR and Teaching with AR

PD Dr. Ralf Klamma | June 17, 2019 | 16:00 | S.2.42

Abstract:

Augmented Reality (AR) is on the way to establishing itself in business and teaching once more. However, there is a lack of uniform guidelines or even standards both in the creation of teaching materials and in the use of AR in teaching. In addition, the industry needs enough well-trained specialists who can implement the established AR concepts, making a transfer from university to industry necessary. Therefore, in this talk we address both challenges in teaching with AR and the special needs of teaching about AR.

As teaching with AR will surely advance human performance and also brings in new perspectives with the communication, coordination and collaboration of AR in supporting human performance. As computer scientists, we have a European, interdisciplinary and application-oriented perspective, as our experience comes from several funded European projects in these areas. We also incorporate new incentives into teaching contexts in our framework, such as gamification, learning analytics and experience capturing. In addition, we refer to international standardization efforts such as IEEE ARLEM.

Teaching about AR adopts a multi-perspective view. First, there is scientific and technological basic knowledge helping to understand the underlying physical and technical principles. Second, there is engineering and design knowledge to master the creation, fabrication, and utilization of AR in many ways. Third, there is the necessary pedagogical knowledge to transform these complex settings in manageable teaching scenarios and processes, e.g. for higher education curricula.

Here, teaching AR can learn from traditions of science and engineering education as well as from more recent knowledge about computer science education. Examples from recent and on-going European projects will illustrate the argumentation.

CV:

Ralf Klamma holds diploma, doctoral and habilitation degrees in computer science from RWTH Aachen University. He leads the research group “advanced community information systems” (ACIS) at the information systems chair, RWTH Aachen University. He is known for his work in major EU projects for Technology Enhanced Learning (PROLEARN, GALA, ROLE, Learning Layers, TELMAP, Tellnet, CUELC, SAGE, BOOST, VIRTUS and WEKIT).

Ralf organized doctoral summer schools & conferences in Technology Enhanced Learning, Web Engineering and Social Network Analysis. He serves as associate editor for Social Network Analysis and Mining (SNAM), Frontiers of AI for Human Learning and Behavior Change and the International Journal on Interaction Design & Architecture(s) (IxD&A).

He was associate editor for IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies (ToLT). His research interests are community information systems, serious games, augmented reality & wearables, web engineering, social network analysis, requirements engineering and technology enhanced learning.

 

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Estimating Space-Time Covariance from Finite Sample Sets

Dr. Stephan Alexander Weiss | May 22, 2019 | 11:00 | B02.1.59

Abstract:

Covariance matrices are central to many adaptive filtering and optimisation problems. In practice, they have to be estimated from a finite number of samples; on this, I will review some known results from spectrum estimation and multiple-input multiple-output communications systems, and how properties that are assumed to be inherent in covariance and power spectral densities can easily be lost in the estimation process. I will discuss new results on space-time covariance estimation, and how the estimation from finite sample sets will impact on factorisations such as the eigenvalue decomposition, which is often key to solving the introductory optimisation problems. The purpose of the presentation is to give you some insight into estimating statistics as well as to provide a glimpse on classical signal processing challenges such as the separation of sources from a mixture of signals.

Stephan Weiss. I am a Professor at the University of Strathclyde and head its Centre for Signal & Image Processing. My particular interests are adaptive filtering and array signal processing.

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Why AI is shaping our games

Dr. Johanna Pirker | May 16, 2019 | 10:00 | B01.0.203

Abstract:

AI is used to create parts of our games. It provides intelligent enemy behavior, techniques such as pathfinding or can be used to generate in-game content procedurally. AI can also play our games. The idea to train computers to beat humans in game-like environments such as Jeopardy!, Chess, or soccer is not a new one. But can AI also design our games? The role of Artificial Intelligence in the game development process is constantly expanding. In this talk, Dr. Pirker will talk about the importance of AI in the past, the present, and especially the future of game development.

Bio:

Dr. Johanna Pirker is researcher at the Institute of Interactive Systems and Data Science at Graz University of Technology (TUG). She finished her Master’s Thesis during a research visit at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) working on collaborative virtual world environments. In 2017, she finished her doctoral dissertation in computer science on motivational environments under the supervision of Christian Gütl (TUG) and John Belcher (MIT). She specialized in games and environments that engage users to learn, train, and work together through motivating tasks. She has long-lasting experience in game design and development, as well as virtual world development and has worked in the video game industry at Electronic Arts. Her research interests include AI, data analysis, immersive environments (VR), games research, gamification strategies, HCI, e-learning, CSE, and IR. She has authored and presented numerous publications in her field and lectured at universities such as Harvard, Berlin Humboldt Universität, or the University of Göttingen. Johanna was listed on the Forbes 30 Under 30 list of science professionals.

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Use, Misuse, and Reuse of Continuous Integration Features

Prof. Shane McIntosh | May 2, 2019 | 14:00 | N.1.42

Abstract:

Continuous Integration (CI) is a popular practice where software systems are automatically compiled and tested as changes appear in the version control system of a project. Like other software artifacts, CI specifications, which describe the CI process, require maintenance effort. In this talk, I will describe the results of an empirical analysis of patterns of feature use and misuse in the Travis CI specifications of 9,312 open source systems. To help developers to detect and remove patterns of misuse, we propose Hansel and Gretel, anti-pattern detection and removal tools for Travis CI specifications. To help developers to rapidly develop and reuse common CI logic, we propose an extension to the TouchCORE modelling tool that allows users to select high-level features from CI feature models and generate an appropriate CI specification. To support this envisioned tool, we perform an initial analysis of common CI features using association rule mining, which yielded underwhelming results.

Bio:

Shane McIntosh is an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at McGill University, where he leads the Software Repository Excavation and Build Engineering Labs (Software REBELs). He received his PhD in Computer Science from Queen’s University, for which he was awarded the Governor General of Canada’s Academic Gold Medal. In his research, Shane uses empirical software engineering techniques to study software build systems, release engineering, and software quality. More about his work is available online at http://rebels.ece.mcgill.ca/.

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A Survey of Evaluation Techniques and Systems for Answer Set Programming

Prof. Francesco Ricca | May 3, 2019 | 11:00 | S.1.42

Abstract:

Answer set programming (ASP) is a prominent knowledge representation and reasoning paradigm that found both industrial and scientific applications. The success of ASP is due to the combination of two factors: a rich modeling language and the availability of efficient ASP implementations. In this talk we trace the history of ASP systems, describing the key evaluation techniques and their implementation in actual tools.

CV:

Francesco Ricca (www.mat.unical.it/ricca) is currently an Associate Professor at the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science of the University of Calabria, Italy. In the same Department he is Coordinator of the Computer Science Courses Council.
He received his Laurea Degree in Computer Science Engineering (2002) and a PhD in Computer Science and Mathematics (2006) from the University of Calabria, Italy, and received the Habilitation for Full Professor in Computer Science (INF/01) in 2017.
He is interested in declarative logic-based languages, consistent query answering, and rule-based reasoning on ontologies and in particular on the issues concerning their practical applications: system design and implementation, and development tools.
He is co-author of more than 100 (peer-reviewed) publications including international research journals (30+), encyclopedia chapters, conference proceedings, and workshops of national and international importance. He has served in program committees of international conference and workshop, such as IJCAI, AAAI, KR, ICLP, LPNMR and JELIA, and has been reviewer for AIJ, JAIR, TPLP, JLC, etc. He is Area Editor of Association for Logic Programming newsletters, and member of the Executive Board of the Italian Association for Artificial Intelligence.

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Forgetful, shortsighted demons in wireless communications (in Kooperation mit der Lakeside Labs GmbH)

Harun Siljak, PhD | February 26, 2019 | 15:30 | B04.1.114 (Lakeside B04, Eingang b, 1. Stock)

Abstract:

The common theme of results presented in this talk is control of complex systems in wireless communications subject to information loss, either because of noise/equipment limitations or because of the controller’s inability to wait long enough or see far enough. Can we reconstruct the past and/or predict the future based on imperfect information and why would we want to do it in the first place?

Bio:

Harun Siljak obtained his BoE and MoE degrees in control engineering from University of Sarajevo in 2010 and 2012, respectively, and his PhD in electrical engineering from International Burch University Sarajevo in 2015. After working at International Burch University and Bell Labs Ireland, he joined Trinity College Dublin as an EDGE Marie Curie Fellow in 2017 to work on his project on complexity and control in distributed massive MIMO. His research interests include physics of computation, reversibility, wave propagation and nonlinear dynamics. His other interests include popular science and science fiction writing, as well as collaborations with artists and writers.

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